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Meet a Novel Effect Librarian: Danielle Fritz

Did you know that Novel Effect has its very own team of literary leaders? Our librarians are responsible for sourcing and selecting stories that are turned into soundscapes. They help curate and organize our growing collection of titles so that teachers, librarians, and parents can easily find and enjoy a magical read aloud with their students and kids.
Danielle Fritz stands in front of a bookcase smiling at the camera

Get to know one of our talented librarians and hear her recommendations:

Name: Danielle Fritz
Role: Librarian & Curator

How would you describe your role at Novel Effect?
As a Librarian & Curator, I’m responsible for not only finding books to add to the app but finding the right books. I have to not only rely on my own instinct and training but on feedback from our readers and educators. It’s a fun challenge!

What was your favorite book as a kid?
This is a tough one! I was always a big fan of anything illustrated by Steven Kellog, especially the Pinkerton books. My parents also often read Love You Forever by Robert Munsch and Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown. We still quote Julius, Baby of the World by Kevin Henkes to one another–a family friend gifted it to us when my brother joined the family and I was not excited about sharing my parent’s attention.

What are your favorite stories to read with Novel Effect?
I adore Not Quite a Narwhal by Jessie Sima, I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen, and The Paperbag Princess by Robert Munsch. One of our recent additions, Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes has also become one of my new favorites!

Why are read alouds so important? What are the benefits for kids?
Stats show us that children who are read to often see long-term benefits. They’re more prepared for school, more empathetic, and placed on a path to success. Plus, reading is fun and creates an opportunity for bonding! Your children will remember you taking the time to read to them. Your students will look back on the books you picked to read aloud in class and recall them fondly. It’s truly an activity that gives and gives in numerous ways.

What or who encouraged you to pursue your career path?
I was really lucky to have a team of people who inspired me throughout my life. My parents really emphasized reading when I was little and brought me to the library weekly. My childhood librarian, Gay Wilson, always made time to talk with me when I returned my books — even when I racked up a $20 late fee. My gifted ed teacher, Lori Herring, was also a huge influence. She taught me that learning is lifelong, and what better way to learn than by becoming involved in librarianship?

What is your advice for parents, teachers, or librarians to help get kids more excited about reading?
Finding a book that engages the child in your life is a gateway to developing a lifelong love of reading. Don’t discount things like graphic novels–they’re just as valid as any other book. Start reading young; infants can still benefit from time spent together sharing a book, reading to our youngest children fosters speech development among other things. And don’t put too much pressure on the act itself. I hated reading until I found just the right book for me. And now I’m 6 years into a library career!

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